News archive - 2014

Study uncovers why almost winning is just as good for some gamblers

A new study led by the University of Exeter and Swansea University has pinpointed the changes in the brain that lead gamblers to react in the same way to near-misses as they do to winning.

New study combats depression in carers

Psychologists from the University of Exeter are trialling an innovative new type of support to help relatives and friends who care for stroke survivors – with studies showing that currently one in three become depressed or suffer other mental health problems.

Politicians to be offered new service for tapping the latest academic research

A national consultation about a pioneering scheme to provide British politicians with unparalleled access to the very latest academic research has been launched.

Evidence Based Research to help our Veterans and families

CEDAR and the Mood Disorders Centre are pleased to announce that they have been asked to be a leading part of Help for Heroes Hidden Wounds Psychological Support Programme, a 2.7 m consortium project that aims to provide evidence based psychological support for veterans and families.

Friends with many benefits

Dr Lauren Brent, a post doc in the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour in Psychology, has had her paper on the evolution of friendship published in New Scientist.

Celebrating IAPT - Past, Present and Future

The beginning of July saw CEDAR welcome colleagues from all over the UK to join us to celebrate 6 years of High Intensity IAPT training and look to the future of IAPT across the UK through a day’s conference, hosted by Professor Eugene Mullan and Dr Rachel Handley.

Exeter psychologist gives expert evidence on head injury and re-offending link

A University of Exeter psychologist will today give evidence to the Justice Committee of the Scottish Parliament calling for recognition of the connection between head injury and re-offending.

New study takes the shine off magpie folklore

Magpies are not attracted to shiny objects and don’t routinely steal small trinkets such as jewellery, according to a new study.

Why plants in the office make us more productive

‘Green’ offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than ‘lean’ designs stripped of greenery, new research shows.

Skin colouring of rhesus macaque monkeys linked to breeding success

Skin colour displayed amongst one species of monkey provides a key indicator of how successfully they will breed, a new study has shown.

Eureka moments between the sciences and the arts

Exeter academics have secured two of seven research awards to explore the cutting edge relationships between the sciences and the arts and humanities.

Study shows sharks have personalities

Some sharks are ‘gregarious’ and have strong social connections, whilst others are more solitary and prefer to remain inconspicuous.

Mindfulness: What we have done and where we are going

A flagship event for disseminating Mindfulness research was held in September in Exeter as part of an initiative to share information about recent mindfulness research at the University of Exeter.  

Creatively exploring mental health

A workshop to increase awareness of alternative approaches to treating mental illness and fostering wellbeing is being held at St Stephen’s Church, High Street Exeter on Friday 7 November. 

Brain’s response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for

Being shown pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain’s response to threat, new research from the University of Exeter has found.

Macho stereotypes put off men as well as women

Some men are being driven away from macho occupations like surgery and the Royal Marines because they don’t feel that they are ‘man enough’, according to new research.

What really helps women achieve a good work-life balance?

Professor Michelle Ryan delivers keynote at prestigious conference on what really helps women achieve a good work/life balance.

Training elderly in social media improves well-being and combats isolation

Training older people in the use of social media improves cognitive capacity, increases a sense of self-competence and could have a beneficial overall impact on mental health and well-being.

CLES research rated internationally excellent in latest national assessment

CLES research has been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the first assessment of the research quality of UK universities since 2008, the Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing

Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal colour, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter.