Couple on bench by the beach

Projects

        

Living well with cognitive impairment and dementia

IDEAL

The IDEAL project is a five-year study of 1500 people with dementia and their family carers throughout the UK. The project will investigate how social and psychological factors affect the way in which people adapt to the effects of dementia and the challenges it presents, and how this changes over time as dementia progresses. The project is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and National Institute for Health Research. An associated arts-based project, A Life More Ordinary, led by artists Ian Beesley, Ian McMillan and Tony Husband, engages people with dementia and carers in sharing their experiences about living with dementia. See our 'A Life More Ordinary' artist's workshop flyer and project webpage for details more about the project. 

Key publication to date: Protocol (open access)

Contact: Professor Linda Clare L.Clare@exeter.ac.uk or Dr Sharon Nelis S.M.Nelis@exeter.ac.uk

GREAT

We are leading a large-scale study, GREAT, evaluating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for people with early-stage dementia, funded by the National Institute of Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme. This builds on earlier pilot work supported by the Alzheimer's Society.

Key publication to date: Protocol (open access)

Contact: Dr Aleksandra (Ola) Kudlicka A.Kudlicka@exeter.ac.uk

 

Maintaining cognitive health in later life

INDIGO

We are collaborating in INDIGO, an Australian randomised controlled trial of a physical activity intervention for sedentary older people at risk of cognitive decline, based on individual goal-setting and supported by volunteer mentors, led by Professor Nicola Lautenschlager at the University of Melbourne.

Key publication to date: Protocol (open access)

Contact: Professor Linda Clare L.Clare@exeter.ac.uk

CFAS Wales

We are investigating psychological and social factors that contribute to cognitive reserve in later life as part of the ESRC-funded CFAS Wales study (Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales), led by Professor Bob Woods, in which we collaborate.

Key publication to date: Protocol (open access)

Contact: Professor Linda Clare L.Clare@exeter.ac.uk

 

Supporting family care

IDEAL

The IDEAL cohort study of people with dementia and their family carers throughout the UK, described above, focuses on the extent to which carers, as well as the people with dementia they care for, are able to live well with dementia.

Key publication to date: Protocol (open access)

Contact: Professor Linda Clare L.Clare@exeter.ac.uk or Dr Sharon Nelis S.M.Nelis@exeter.ac.uk

DECIDE

The DECIDE team, led by Dr Penny Wright at the University of Leeds, is developing a quality of life measure for family carers of people with dementia. DECIDE is linked with the IDEAL project and will collect additional data from carers participating in IDEAL. DECIDE is funded by the Medical Research Council.

Key publication to date: Needs framwork (open access)

Contact: Professor Linda Clare L.Clare@exeter.ac.uk

 

Get involved

If you would like more information about taking part in our research projects please sign-up to our contacts list through our 'Get involved' page.

CORD-PD study

The CORD-PD study aims to find out whether cognitive rehabilitation can improve memory performance in people with Parkinson’s disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies. This pilot study is funded by Health and Care Research Wales as part of the Research for Patient and Public Benefit Wales scheme. The study is led by Dr John Hindle at Bangor University and Prof Linda Clare and Dr Anthony Martyr are coinvestigators.

Key publication to date: Protocol (open access), goal statement findings (open access), study findings to be published soon.

Contact: Dr John Hindle j.v.hindle@bangor.ac.uk

AgeWell study

The AgeWell study, carried out in partnership with Age Cymru Gwynedd a Môn, made it possible to establish an AgeWell Centre in Nefyn, Gwynedd, and to investigate how best to help people make the most of this resource to promote health and well-being. This study was funded by the Medical Research Council through the Lifelong Health and Well-being Programme. A report of the findings can be found here.

Key publication: here (open access)

The Bangor Goal-Setting Interview was developed for this study, an updated Version 2 can be found at the bottom of the publications and resources section of the website.

Contact: Dr Sharon Nelis s.nelis@exeter.ac.uk

Bilingualism as a protective factor in Age-related Neurodegenerative Conditions (BANC) study

The BANC study aimed to find out whether being bilingual helps to prevent or delay the onset of cognitive impairment and dementia, and to consider why this might be and how the insights gained could be used to help those who do not naturally have this advantage. Three groups of people were included in the study, people with dementia, people with Parkinson's disease, and healthy older controls. This study was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Key publications: Dementia, Parkinson's (open access), healthy older people, cognitive reserve in Parkinson's

Summary findings available in English or Welsh.

Contact: Professor Linda Clare l.clare@exeter.ac.uk or Dr Anthony Martyr a.martyr@exeter.ac.uk

Self-MAnagement in dementia: a pilot Randomised controlled Trial (SMART)

The SMART study aimed to find out how best to support people in developing the capacity for self-management in the early stages of dementia. In conjunction with staff at Glan Traeth memory clinic in Rhyl, North-Wales, we developed a support group that focused on self-management skills. The group was piloted in a randomized controlled trial. This research was funded by Health and Care Research Wales. A summary of the findings can be found here.

Key publications: findings from the trial, qualitative analysis of people with dementia involved in the trial, and review of previous interventions

Contact: Dr Catherine Quinn c.quinn@exeter.ac.uk

NeuroSKILL

We are participating in the NeuroSKILL programme, which is funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Ireland-Wales Programme 2007-13. Our contribution was to examine how people with early-stage dementia and their family members understand, and adjust to, the condition, and to explore how the results of neuroimaging investigations can be used to help people make sense of the condition.

Key publications: here, Illness representations using MIDAS data in people with dementia, carers

Contact: Dr Catherine Quinn c.quinn@exeter.ac.uk

Recreational Stimulation for Elders as a Vehicle to resolve Delirium Superimposed on Dementia (RESERVE-DSD)

We are collaborating in a trial of a novel intervention for people with delirium superimposed on dementia, RESERVE-DSD, which is being conducted in the USA under the leadership of Professor Ann Kolanowski at Pennsylvania State University. This is funded by the US National Institutes of Health.

Key publications: here, and here

Contact: Professor Linda Clare l.clare@exeter.ac.uk

Memory Impairment and Dementia Awareness Study (MIDAS)

MIDAS, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, examined the awareness that people with early-stage dementia have of the changes they are experiencing, and the factors that influence awareness. The Memory Awareness Rating Scale that was employed in MIDAS can be found in the publications and resources section of the website.

Key publications: Biopsychosocial factors, Longitudinal trajectories, Emotional Stroop, Functional ability, Self-concept, MCI and dementia, Quality of life (open access), Quality of life over time, Memory awareness

Contact: Professor Linda Clare l.clare@exeter.ac.uk

AwareCare study

In the AwareCare study, funded by the Medical Research Council, we used detailed observations to develop a tool that can be used to assess the degree of awareness shown by people with very severe dementia, and trained staff in its use. Residents' family members rated residents' quality of life more highly in homes where staff participated in this training. The AwareCare tool can be found in the publications and resources section of the website.

Key publication: here, AwareCare measure development

Contact: Professor Linda Clare l.clare@exeter.ac.uk