Dr Anna Rabinovich
Senior Lecturer

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by year



2014
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., Landon, E., Neill, C., Mason-Brown, S., Burdett, L. (2014). The password is praise: Content of feedback affects categorization of feedback sources. British Journal of Social Psychology, 53, 484-500.
2013
Gleibs, I.H., Morton, T.A., Rabinovich, A., Haslam, S.A., Helliwell, H.F. (2013). Unpacking the hedonic paradox: a dynamic analysis of the relationships between financial capital, social capital and life satisfaction. British Journal of Social Psychology, 52, 25-43.
2012
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., Postmes, T., Verplanken, B. (2012). Collective Self and Individual Choice: the Effects of Intergroup Comparative Context on Environmental Values and Behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 51(4), 551-569.
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., Birney, M.E. (2012). Communicating climate science: the role of perceived communicator's motives. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 32, 11-18.
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A. (2012). Ghosts of the past and dreams of the future: the impact of temporal focus on responses to contextual ingroup devaluation. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38(3), 397-410.
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., Crook, M., Travers, C. (2012). Let another praise you? the effects of source and attributional content on responses to group-directed praise. British Journal of Social Psychology, 51(4), 753-761.
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A. (2012). Sizing fish and ponds: the joint effects of individual- and group-based feedback. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 244-249.
Postmes, T., Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., van Zomeren, M. (2012). Toward Sustainable Social Identities: Including Our Collective Future into the Self-Concept in Van Trijp H (ed) Encouraging Sustainable Behavior, Psychology Press, 191-207.
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A. (2012). Unquestioned answers or unanswered questions: Beliefs about science guide responses to uncertainty in climate change risk communication. Risk Analysis, 32, 992-1002.
Morton, T.A., Rabinovich, A., Postmes, T. (2012). Who we were and who we will be: the temporal context of women’s ingroup stereotype content. British Journal of Social Psychology, 51, 346-362.

Abstract:
Who we were and who we will be: the temporal context of women’s ingroup stereotype content.

Research has elaborated considerably on the dimensions of outgroup stereotype content and on the origins and functions of different content combinations. Less attention has been given to the origins and functions of ingroup stereotype content. We argue that ingroup stereotypes are likely to serve different social identity functions, and thus attract different content, dependent on individual differences in ingroup identification and on the temporal perspective of the perceiver. Two studies (Ns = 43 & 93) found that women’s ingroup stereotype content varied as a function of gender group identification and temporal perspective. When the past was primed, highly identified women generated stereotypes that emphasised the warmth (but not competence) of their group. When the future was primed, highly identified women generated stereotypes that emphasised the competence (as well as warmth) of their group. These results are discussed in terms of the use of stereotypes for social creativity versus social change.
 Abstract.
2011
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A. (2011). Subgroup identities as a key to cooperation within large social groups. British Journal of Social Psychology, 50(1), 36-51.

Abstract:
Subgroup identities as a key to cooperation within large social groups

We experimentally investigated the effect of superordinate (i.e. British) versus subordinate (i.e. English) identity salience on willingness to contribute to a resource shared at the superordinate level (the British coast). Contrary to what would be expected from straightforward application of self-categorization theory, two studies demonstrated that willingness to contribute to this shared resource was higher when subordinate (rather than superordinate) identity was activated. To explain this effect, we suggest that subordinate identities sometimes provide a more meaningful basis for self-definition and, when this is the case, activating subordinate level of identity might lay the foundation for enhanced co-operation within higher-order identities. Indeed, consistent with this argument, Study 2 showed that increased meaningfulness and coherence of the self-concept mediated the effect of subordinate identity salience on contributions to the shared (superordinate) resource. The results are discussed with respect to the role of meaning in determining categorization effects.
 Abstract.
Morton, T.A., Rabinovich, A., Marshall, D., Bretschneider, P. (2011). The future that may (or may not) come: How framing changes responses to uncertainty in climate change communications. Global Environmental Change, 21(1), 103-109.

Abstract:
The future that may (or may not) come: How framing changes responses to uncertainty in climate change communications.

Communicating possible effects of climate change inevitably involves uncertainty. Because people are generally averse to uncertainty, this activity has the potential to undermine effective action more than stimulate it. The present research considered how framing climate change predictions differently might moderate the tendency for uncertainty to undermine individual action. Two studies (Ns = 88 & 120) show that higher uncertainty combined with a negative frame (highlighting possible losses) decreased individual intentions to behave environmentally. However when higher uncertainty was combined with a positive frame (highlighting the possibility of losses not materializing) this produced stronger intentions to act. Study 2 revealed that these effects of uncertainty were mediated through feelings of efficacy. These results suggest that uncertainty is not an inevitable barrier to action, provided communicators frame climate change messages in ways that trigger caution in the face of uncertainty.
 Abstract.
2010
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., Duke, C.C. (2010). Collective self and individual choice: the role of social comparisons in promoting public engagement with climate change. In Whitmarsh L,O'Neill S (eds.) Engaging the Public with Climate Change: Communication and Behaviour Change, Earthscan, 66-83.
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T., Postmes, T. (2010). Time perspective and attitude-behaviour consistency in future-oriented behaviours. Br J Soc Psychol, 49(Pt 1), 69-89.

Abstract:
Time perspective and attitude-behaviour consistency in future-oriented behaviours.

The authors propose that the salience of a distant-future time perspective, compared to a near-future time perspective, should increase attitude-behaviour and attitude-intention consistency for future-oriented behaviours. To test this prediction, time perspective was experimentally manipulated in three studies. Across studies, participants in the distant-future time perspective condition demonstrated a strong positive relationship between attitudes towards future-oriented behaviours (saving and environmental protection) and corresponding intentions, as well as between attitudes and behaviour. In the near-future time perspective condition, the relationship between attitudes and intentions and attitudes and behaviour was significantly weaker than in the distant-future time perspective condition. The theoretical implications of these results and suggestions for future research are discussed.
 Abstract.  Author URL
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A. (2010). Who says we are bad people? the impact of criticism source and attributional content on responses to group-based criticism. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 4(36), 524-536.

Abstract:
Who says we are bad people? the impact of criticism source and attributional content on responses to group-based criticism.

We investigated the interplay between the source of criticism and the attributional content of their message on behavioral responses to group-based criticism. Studies 1 and 2 revealed that outgroup critics were more effective when their criticism included internal attributions (to the ingroup’s character) rather than external attributions (the ingroup’s circumstances), whereas there was no effect of attributional content for ingroup critics (a significant Source × Content interaction). Study 3 explored the role of audiences in responses to outgroup criticism. The results indicated that the positive effects of internal versus external attributions were only evident when an outgroup audience was witness to participants’ responses. Furthermore, these effects were mediated through concerns about the ingroup’s image. Together, these patterns suggest that responses to criticism depend not just on the identity of the critic but also on what the critic says and who is watching. People may be surprisingly responsive to outgroup criticism—particularly when inaction might lead others to perceive them as “bad people.”
 Abstract.
2009
Rabinovich, A., Morton, T.A., Postmes, T., Verplanken, B. (2009). Think global, act local: the effect of goal and mindset specificity on willingness to donate to an environmental organization. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 29, 391-399.
2008
Wilson-Kovacs, D., Ryan, M.K., Haslam, S.A. (2008). Just because you can get a wheelchair in the building doesn't necessarily mean that you can still participate: Barriers to the career advancement of disabled professionals. Disability and Society, 23(7), 705-717.

Abstract:
Just because you can get a wheelchair in the building doesn't necessarily mean that you can still participate: Barriers to the career advancement of disabled professionals

Despite governmental efforts and organizational initiatives, the number of disabled professionals in full-time employment is small, and the number of those occupying leadership positions remains even smaller. Past research into disability and employment has outlined a range of barriers that disabled people face in seeking and maintaining employment. Yet, not enough is known about the challenges they encounter in top ranking appointments. This article extends Ryan's and Haslam's notion of the glass cliff to help explain the precariousness experienced by a group of disabled employees in leadership positions--focusing on the nature of the positions they hold and the difficulties they encounter as they attempt to advance their careers. Using qualitative interview data the analysis draws attention to problems associated with lack of opportunity, lack of resources and lack of support. It also point to ways of making workplace cultures and organizational practices more supportive of diversity.
 Abstract.
2007
Rabinovich, A., Webley, P. (2007). Filling the gap between planning and doing: Psychological factors involved in the successful implementation of saving intention. Journal of Economic Psychology, 28(4), 444-461. Author URL

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