Hebba Haddad
PhD Research Student

Research

Research interests

Hebba’s research interests mainly centre on environmental and social psychology, communication and sustainable behaviours; particularly travel behaviour.

Research projects

Hebba was awarded the ESRC/Met Office collaborative studentship on understanding the dynamics of communicating climate change information, which started October 2009. The PhD is taking a mixed-methods approach to explore the effectiveness and influence of climate science information on behaviour. The project is part of the ESRC-funded Capacity Building Cluster in Sport, Leisure and Tourism at the University of Exeter with the work aiming to examine the influence of message factors and social psychological factors in delivering and receiving climate change information, and its (potential) influence on travel mode choices. She is being supervised by Dr Thomas Morton in the School of Psychology at the University of Exeter, in collaboration with Dr Debbie Hemming from the Met Office Hadley Centre and Sarah Tempest from the Met Office.

Before joining Exeter Hebba was a research associate at the Centre for Transport & Society at the University of the West of England, Bristol from 2006-2009. She was the principal researcher on the EPSRC-funded FUTURES study ‘Teleworking - Trends in and Causes of Location Independent Working‘; a longitudinal project gathering panel data and exploring the characteristics and trends of homeworking and the effects on (urban) commuting patterns. She was also the principal researcher on a Strategic Promotion of Ageing Research Capacity (SPARC) project which was funded by the EPSRC and the BBSRC; this study examined older people‘s driving needs, how new technologies could prolong safe driving and older people‘s attitudes to such technologies. She also worked on a Department for Transport project concerning road pricing.

Hebba completed an MSc in Environmental Psychology at the University of Surrey. Her Masters dissertation applied social psychology to investigate both cyclists’ and non-cyclists’ perceptions of the stereotypical cyclist, cycling identities and how self-identity as a cyclist influences cycling intentions within the Theory of Planned Behaviour framework.

Publications

Journal papers and book chapters

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2010). Exploring older drivers’ perceptions of driving.  European Journal of Ageing, 7 (3), 181-188.

Musselwhite, C. and Haddad, H. (2010). Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life. Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 11, 25-37.

Gatersleben, B. and Haddad, H. (2010).  Who is the typical bicyclist?  Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 13, 41-48.

Haddad, H., Lyons, G., and Chatterjee, K. (2009). An examination of determinants influencing the desire for and frequency of part-day and whole-day homeworking. Journal of Transport Geography, 17, 124-133.

Lyons, G. and Haddad, H. (2008). Commute displacement or commute replacement: the rise of part-day homeworking. Transportation Research Record, 2082, 1-7.

Lyons, G., Farag, S. and Haddad, H. (2008). The substitution of communications for travel? In Ison, S. and Rye, T. (Eds). The Implementation and Effectiveness of Transport Demand Management Measures: An International Perspective, Ashgate, Chapter 11, 211-232.

Conferences and presentations

Haddad, H. (2012). Dynamics of Communication Climate Change Information. Poster presentation at the Centre for Sport, Leisure and Tourism Research’s Spring Research Showcase, Church House, Westminster, London, April.

Haddad, H., Morton, T. and Rabinovich, A.  (2012).  The roles of ‘tone of voice‘ and uncertainty when communicating climate change information. Presented at the Planet Under Pressure 2012 Conference, Excel London, March.

Haddad, H., Morton, T. and Rabinovich, A.  (2011). How best to communicate climate change? Similarities and differences in the perspectives of climate scientists and professional communicators. 2nd One-Day Research Student Conference: Human Behaviour and Climate Change. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, September.

Haddad, H., Morton, T. and Rabinovich, A.  (2011).  The roles of ‘tone of voice‘ and uncertainty when communicating climate change information. British Psychological Society Social Section Conference, 2011, Cambridge, September.

Haddad, H. (2010).  Dynamics of Communicating Climate Change Information.  Sport, Leisure and Tourism Capacity Building Cluster Showcase, University of Exeter, June.

Haddad, H. (2009). Flexible working practices – the case of part-day homeworking. FUTURES: Transport in Cities conference. London Transport Museum, May.

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2009). Using Grounded Theory to Elicit the Driving Needs of Older People. Invited paper at the International conference on Inclusive Design Royal College of Art, London, April. (Full paper available)

Haddad, H. (2009). Teleworking – trends in and causes of location independent work. Centre for Transport & Society Seminar, University of the West of England, Bristol, February.

Musselwhite, C.B.A. and Haddad, H. (2008). Older men and their cars. Invited presentation at the BA Festival of Science, Liverpool, September.

Musselwhite, C.B.A. and Haddad, H. (2008). Travel and well-being. Travel independence and car dependence: an exploration of older drivers travel and driving needs. Invited presentation at the British Society of Gerontology Conference, Bristol, September.

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2008). An exploration into the travel needs of older drivers. Presentation at the 4th International Conference on Traffic and Transport Psychology, Washington D.C, August-September.

Musselwhite, C. B. A., Haddad, H. and Walker, I. (2008). Self-Identity, Impression Management and Travel Mode Choice. Poster presentation at the 4th International Conference on Traffic and Transport Psychology, Washington D.C, August-September.

Haddad, H. and Lyons, G (2008). An exploration of demographic, work, home and commute aspects of part-day and whole-day homeworking. Invited paper presented at Third International Specialist Meeting on ICT, Everyday Life and Urban Change, March 16-19 2008, Bristol, UK. (Full paper available)

Lyons, G. and Haddad, H. (2008). Commute displacement or commute replacement: the rise of part-day homeworking. Paper presented at the 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington D.C, January. (Full paper available)

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2008). A Grounded Theory exploration into the driving and travel needs of older people. Proc. 40th Universities Transport Study Group Conference, University of Southampton, Portsmouth, January. (Full paper available)

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2007). Putting your Foot Down. Invited to present at the Older People on the Move Workshop, University of Reading, September.

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2006). Prolonging safer driving through technology: user views. Invited to present at the Transport for Older People Workshop, Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds, October.

Lyons, G., Haddad, H. and Jones, T. (2006). Introducing Consideration of Varied-Spatiotemporal Workers to the Study of Teleworking, paper presented at the 11th International Conference on Travel Behaviour Research, Kyoto, August. (Full paper available)

Other

Lyons G, Dudley G, Goodwin P, Clegg S, and Haddad H, (2010) TDP Demonstrations Project Report: Road Users, Department for Transport, London 31.3.2010. http://assets.dft.gov.uk/publications/road-pricing-demonstration-project-social-research-reports/roadusersmethodologyreport.pdf

Lyons, G. and Haddad, H. (2009).  Fragmenting the working day – a look into the rise of part-day homeworking.  17 May, HR Review.

Musselwhite, C. B. A. and Haddad, H. (2007). Prolonging the Safe Driving of Older People through Technology. Final report, October 2007. Centre for Transport & Society, University of the West of England, Bristol.

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