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Dr Denise Wilkins

Postdoctoral Research Associate

 2444

 01392 722444

 Washington Singer 301

 

Washington Singer Laboratories, University of Exeter, Perry Road, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK

Overview

I studied BSc Psychology at Loughborough University before obtaining my MSc in Psychological Research Methods at the University of Exeter. I completed a PhD in Social Psychology at the University of Exeter.

My most recent role is a research associate. I am currently working on the EPSRC funded project HoSEM: Household Supplier Energy Market, which aims to explore the possibility of new forms of peer-to-peer renewable energy markets, underpinned by distributed ledger technology.

More broadly, my research interests centre around the intersection between digital technology and society. In particular, how technology use shapes, and is shaped by, the social psychological concerns of technology users.

Beyond my own research, I enjoy being involved in strategies aimed at public engagement and widening participation in higher education.

Broad research specialisms:

  • social identity;
  • collective action;
  • renewable energy;
  • social media;
  • distributed ledger technology;

Qualifications

BSc (Hons) Psychology, Loughborough University
MSc Psychological Research Methods, University of Exeter
PhD Social Psychology, University of Exeter

Career

Before my academic career I worked for the Civil Service; including the Department for Work and Pensions, and the Scottish Government. I have also worked in market research and the charity sector.

Research group links

Research

Research interests

  • Social identity
  • Collective action
  • Political rhetoric
  • Renewable energy
  • Digital technology

Research projects

My current research project is the EPSRC funded project HoSEM: Household Energy Supplier Market, which aims to explore the possibility of new forms of peer-to-peer renewable energy markets, underpinned by distributed ledger technology.

My PhD project broadly examined how the use of social media use for collective action shapes, and is shaped by, the social psychological concerns of social media users. Supervised by Professor Mark Levine and Dr. Andrew Livingstone, the projected tested whether and how individuals’ initial decisions to participate in collective action are influenced by the digital environment, and how participating in “online” collective action affects future engagement. I also explored how groups use social media to maintain control of contested social movements and advance disparate social change aims.

Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Wilkins DJ, Levine M, Livingstone A (In Press). All click, no action? Online action, efficacy perceptions, and prior experience combine to affect future collective action. Computers in Human Behavior Full text.

Publications by category


Journal articles

Wilkins DJ, Levine M, Livingstone A (In Press). All click, no action? Online action, efficacy perceptions, and prior experience combine to affect future collective action. Computers in Human Behavior Full text.
Wilkins D, Livingstone A, Levine M (In Press). Whose tweets? the rhetorical functions of social media use in developing the Black Lives Matter movement. British Journal of Social Psychology Full text.

Publications by year


In Press

Wilkins DJ, Levine M, Livingstone A (In Press). All click, no action? Online action, efficacy perceptions, and prior experience combine to affect future collective action. Computers in Human Behavior Full text.
Wilkins D, Livingstone A, Levine M (In Press). Whose tweets? the rhetorical functions of social media use in developing the Black Lives Matter movement. British Journal of Social Psychology Full text.

D_Wilkins Details from cache as at 2019-08-20 20:49:34

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Teaching

Supervision / Group

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