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Dr Lexy Newbold

Dr Lexy Newbold

RCT Trial Manager

 07890384247

 Sir Henry Wellcome Building for Mood Disorders Research F05

 

Sir Henry Wellcome Building for Mood Disorders Research, University of Exeter, Queens Drive, Exeter, EX4 4QQ, UK

Overview

Lexy is a Trial Manager working for Exeter Clinical Trials Unit. She specialises in managing randomised controlled trial testing new interventions designed to prevent, or treat mental health disorders especially e health, online and app-based interventions. She is currently managing two international randomised controlled trials within the ECoWeB project: Assessing and Enhancing Emotional Competence for Well-Being in Young Adults: A principled, evidence-based, mobile-health approach to prevent mental disorders and promote mental well-being. This Horizon 2020 funded project aims to test a new self-help app designed to improve wellbeing and prevent mental ill health in young adultsacross Europe. She is also managing 3 research trials within the Student Mental Health Project funded by the MRC which aim to improve student mental health nationally.

Lexy is a research psychologist with a PgDip in Psychological Research Methods (2002) and a PHD in Psychology (2007), both from the University of Plymouth. Her PhD investigated perceptions of genetically modified foods and she has presented nationally and internationally on this issue. She worked as a researcher in the School of Psychology from 2000 to 2009 on a range of research projects including ‘Improving Communication in Times of Emergency’ which was funded by the Home Office. This mixed methods project applied research findings to real world environmental risk communication in the Plymouth area such as the possible nuclear risk from Devonport nuclear refit yard. She then went on to coordinate the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Evaluation Project at the Peninsula Medical School of Plymouth. This mixed methods project investigated how the design of the new NHS services providing talking therapies for patients with anxiety and depression affected patient outcomes, such as access to services and recovery. Lexy also has 12 years’ experience of teaching clinical and developmental psychology, statistics and research methods part time on the psychology undergraduate course at the University of Plymouth.

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Research

Research interests

Lexy‘s research interests include how to improve the communication of information conveying health risk, and applying the findings of risk perception research to real world risk communication. More latterly her research has moved into the area of talking therapies for anxiety and depression. In particular what aids recovery for people with anxiety and depression and how that recovery can be measured. She has a special interest in the use of hypnotherapy and emotional freedom technique in improving wellbeing.

Research grants:

Hellier, Newbold and Edworthy, (2008) Evaluating the Application of Research Findings to Emergency Communication (£62,500)

Newbold and Byng (2010) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Evaluation Project, PenCLAHRC funding £22,789

Newbold and Byng (2011) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Evaluation Project, PenCLAHRC funding £55,691

Links


Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by category


Journal articles

Wright K, Dodd A, Warren F, Medina-Lara A, Dunn B, Harvey J, Javaid M, Jones S, Owens C, Taylor R, et al (In Press). Psychological Therapy for Mood Instability within Bipolar Spectrum Disorder: a Randomised, Controlled Feasibility Trial of a Dialectical Behaviour Therapy-Informed Approach (the ThrIVe-B Programme). International Journal of Bipolar Disorders Full text.
Edge D, Newbold A, Ehring T, Rosenkranz T, Frost M, Watkins ER (2021). Reducing worry and rumination in young adults via a mobile phone app: study protocol of the ECoWeB (Emotional Competence for Well-Being in Young Adults) randomised controlled trial focused on repetitive negative thinking. BMC Psychiatry, 21(1). Abstract.
Watkins ER, Newbold A (2020). Factorial Designs Help to Understand How Psychological Therapy Works. Front Psychiatry, 11 Abstract.  Author URL.
Newbold A, Warren FC, Taylor RS, Hulme C, Burnett S, Aas B, Botella C, Burkhardt F, Ehring T, Fontaine JRJ, et al (2020). Promotion of mental health in young adults via mobile phone app: study protocol of the ECoWeB (emotional competence for well-being in Young adults) cohort multiple randomised trials. BMC Psychiatry, 20(1). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Wright K, Dodd A, Warren FC, Medina-Lara A, Taylor R, Jones S, Owens C, Javaid M, Dunn B, Harvey JE, et al (2018). The clinical and cost effectiveness of adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for bipolar mood instability in primary care (ThrIVe-B programme): a feasibility study. Trials, 19(1). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Watkins E, Newbold A, Tester-Jones M, Javaid M, Cadman J, Collins LM, Graham J, Mostazir M (2016). Implementing multifactorial psychotherapy research in online virtual environments (IMPROVE-2): study protocol for a phase III trial of the MOST randomized component selection method for internet cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression. BMC Psychiatry, 16(1). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Zahra D, Qureshi A, Henley W, Taylor R, Quinn C, Pooler J, Hardy G, Newbold A, Byng R (2014). The work and social adjustment scale: reliability, sensitivity and value. Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract, 18(2), 131-138. Abstract.  Author URL.
Newbold A, Hardy G, Byng R (2013). Staff and patient experience of improving access to psychological therapy group interventions for anxiety and depression. Journal of Mental Health, 22(5), 456-464.

Publications by year


In Press

Wright K, Dodd A, Warren F, Medina-Lara A, Dunn B, Harvey J, Javaid M, Jones S, Owens C, Taylor R, et al (In Press). Psychological Therapy for Mood Instability within Bipolar Spectrum Disorder: a Randomised, Controlled Feasibility Trial of a Dialectical Behaviour Therapy-Informed Approach (the ThrIVe-B Programme). International Journal of Bipolar Disorders Full text.

2021

Edge D, Newbold A, Ehring T, Rosenkranz T, Frost M, Watkins ER (2021). Reducing worry and rumination in young adults via a mobile phone app: study protocol of the ECoWeB (Emotional Competence for Well-Being in Young Adults) randomised controlled trial focused on repetitive negative thinking. BMC Psychiatry, 21(1). Abstract.

2020

Watkins ER, Newbold A (2020). Factorial Designs Help to Understand How Psychological Therapy Works. Front Psychiatry, 11 Abstract.  Author URL.
Newbold A, Warren FC, Taylor RS, Hulme C, Burnett S, Aas B, Botella C, Burkhardt F, Ehring T, Fontaine JRJ, et al (2020). Promotion of mental health in young adults via mobile phone app: study protocol of the ECoWeB (emotional competence for well-being in Young adults) cohort multiple randomised trials. BMC Psychiatry, 20(1). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2018

Wright K, Dodd A, Warren FC, Medina-Lara A, Taylor R, Jones S, Owens C, Javaid M, Dunn B, Harvey JE, et al (2018). The clinical and cost effectiveness of adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for bipolar mood instability in primary care (ThrIVe-B programme): a feasibility study. Trials, 19(1). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2016

Watkins E, Newbold A, Tester-Jones M, Javaid M, Cadman J, Collins LM, Graham J, Mostazir M (2016). Implementing multifactorial psychotherapy research in online virtual environments (IMPROVE-2): study protocol for a phase III trial of the MOST randomized component selection method for internet cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression. BMC Psychiatry, 16(1). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2014

Zahra D, Qureshi A, Henley W, Taylor R, Quinn C, Pooler J, Hardy G, Newbold A, Byng R (2014). The work and social adjustment scale: reliability, sensitivity and value. Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract, 18(2), 131-138. Abstract.  Author URL.

2013

Newbold A, Hardy G, Byng R (2013). Staff and patient experience of improving access to psychological therapy group interventions for anxiety and depression. Journal of Mental Health, 22(5), 456-464.

Alexandra_Newbold Details from cache as at 2022-01-24 16:11:22

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2021/22

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